Indoojibwem!

Indoojibwem!

When I set out to look for learning materials on the web, I was initially excited to find so many search results for the language. This excitement quickly faded with the number of 404 - Not Found messages I kept getting on each click of a link. So I've created this space as a repository of resources for learning Anishinaabemowin, or more specifically, Ojibwemowin. With time, I hope it can be of use not just to me, but to others.

Saturday, January 12, 2013

Stepping through a course - Lesson 7

It's been a year and a half since I last updated this blog - way too long. Things got in the way, other priorities took precedence. But my interest in the language hasn't faded. So, I'm restarting this blog, and the first thing on the list is to complete the Pimsleur course. Since the break, I've purchased the course, so I now have the audio to go with the notes I've been using. The notes make so much more sense now, and I'll try to inject my own thoughts in as well.

So, let's continue on with Lesson 7.

Dialog -

F: Boozhoo.
M: Aaniin. Aaniish ezhi-ayaayan giin?
F: Miigwech. Nimino-ayaa niin. Giin dash?
M: Miigwech. Nimino-ayaa.
F: Niwii-wiisin igo. Giin dash?
M: Henh. Gaye niin.
F: Aaniindi niimi'idiwaad.
M: Gaawiin. ingikendanziin.
* * * * * * * * * * * *
F: Gegoo na giwii-minikwen?
F: Gegoo niwii-minikwen.
M: Giwii-wiisin na?
M: Miigwech. Gaawiin. Niwii-minkwe eta go.
F: Henyanh. Miigwech niibowa.
M: Ahaaw.


Breaking it down, line by line:

F: Boozhoo.
  • We learned back in lesson 2 that this was one of two ways we've learned to say "Hello" or Greetings".
M: Aaniin. Aaniish ezhi-ayaayan giin?
  • Aaniin, learned in lesson 1 is the other way to greet someone.
  • We also learned that "Aaniish ezhi-ayaayan" is "How are your?" and in lesson 6, adding "giin" emphasizes "you".
F: Miigwech. Nimino-ayaa niin. Giin dash?
  • Here, we're adding "niin" to "Nimino-ayaa" (I'm fine) to emphasize "I" or "me". "Giin dash" is "and you?"
M: Miigwech. Nimino-ayaa.
  • Same as above, without the emphasis.
F: Niwii-wiisin igo. Giin dash?
  • In lesson 6 we learned that this means "I would like to eat", with "igo" emphasizing "I" or "me". 
M: Henh. Gaye niin.
  • Here we have a new word: "Gaye". It means also, too, as well. So adding "niin" to it makes it "Me too".
F: Aaniindi niimi'idiwaad.
  • In lesson 5 we learned that "niimi-idiwaag" means "they dance"/"they are dancing" and "aaniindi" is "where".
M: Gaawiin. ingikendanziin.
  • In lesson 6 we learned "gikendan" means "to know SOMETHING". Adding "ziin" at the end, as well as using "gaawiin" before the verb turns it into a negative. So it's "I don't know".
* * * * * * * * * * * *

F: Gegoo na giwii-minikwen?
  • Gegoo is a new word this lesson, and it means "something".We also have the new verb "minikwe", meaning "to drink".  So the sentence is "Would you like something to drink?"
F: Gegoo niwii-minikwen.
  • "I'd like something to drink."
M: Giwii-wiisin na?
  • In lesson 6 we learned that this means "Would you like something to eat?"
M: Miigwech. Gaawiin. Niwii-minkwe eta go.
  • "No, thank you. I just want to drink (something is understood)."
 F: Henyanh. Miigwech niibowa.
  • Another new word is "niibowa", meaning "much" or "a lot", so she is saying "Yes. Thanks a lot."
M: Ahaaw.
  • This is the last new word of the lesson, and it means, among many other things "OK". It is used by males. When used to reply to "Miigwech", it can be taken to mean "You're welcome."


New words this lesson:
  • gegoo - something
  • ahaaw - OK; alright [male usage]
  • gaye - also; too; and; as well
  • niibowa - much; a lot
  • minikwe - drink

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